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How to Light Hookah Charcoal: Natural Hookah Coals Lit the Easy Way

 

 There are important stages of evolution in every person's life where lessons learned allow you to take a giant step forward and live your life to greater fulfillment; getting your driver's license, traveling abroad for the first time, learning a new language, riding a mechanical bull (ok, the last one may just be me). An important step in my hookah smoking evolution was the discovery of Coco Nara Natural Hookah Coals. In my genesis, I was seduced by the convenience of low-quality quick-lighting coals I would purchase at my local lounge. The taste of accelerant seemed to be a necessary evil, tolerated as there was no viable alternative in my limited scope. But after being surrounded by shisha junkies it was not long before the earth shifted on its axis and I was introduced to natural light, Coco Nara Hookah Charcoals. These coals burned far more evenly, with less heat (coals are like golf scores, less is more) and any trace of the taste of coal was absent. The difference was like drinking faucet water that had been filtered, if filtered faucet water tasted like angel's tears. Right then and there I began to walk erect. The one drawback of natural coals is they cannot be lit with a standard lighter; they need a more direct source of heat. The easiest way to light the coals is on a standard electric stove top, but unfortunately we do not have a stove in the office and I have a gas stove at home, so necessity being the mother of invention, we used this: the Single Coil Electric Hookah Charcoal Heater. All you need to do is plug it in, crank the heat up to eleven, place 2 or 3 natural coals on the coil, flip after 5 minutes and let them sit until the coals are a nice, ashy gray. I keep one under my desk at work and one next to the stove at home but they are light enough to carry in the pocket of your pants (if you shop at the same pants store as M.C. Hammer). Pants aside, the Hookah Charcoal Heater allows you light natural hookah charcoal just about everywhere and as a tool, it is close behind the wheel and fire in global impact.

Comments (1) -

  • Thanks so much for the info, will give this a try. KIM